Jackie Chan Marathon II: Drunken Master (1978)

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Movie overview:

I cannot really discuss about Jackie Chan movie without mentioning this piece of art. This is one movie than most movies goer would considered to be one of Jackie Chan finest work. Once again, this was before the era of the “Jackie Chan style” of choreography. Nevertheless, scenes involving Jackie Chan fighting, you can already see that it started to build into Jackie’s style of fighting. One attribute of his choreography is the speed and viciousness if his movement. He did not afraid of getting hurt, and he did get hurt, but in the end, his dedication set a benchmark for future movie to look to, and that is more valuable than a chipped tooth, or a broken rib, or skull fractu

res, or a dislocated shoulder, or a broken ankle (This could go on forever). Nonetheless, Drunken Master(1978) is a foundational movie of an icon that we all love and respect.

Plot Overview:

An undisciplined boy must learn Drunken Fist Kung Fu in order to stop an assassin.

Movie Review:

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The first impression I have on this movie is how structured the plot is. In the first instalment of the Jackie Chan Marathon: Snake in the Eagle shadow (1978), I talked about how the plot of the movie was largely unstructured and typical. This movie on the other hand had a strong plot to back up a satisfying movie. The first elements to discuss are their usage of the landscape. Most of the fight was conducted outdoor, which added an audience to the mix. This often can give the audience a sense of involvement as they may feel like they ardrunken_mastere watching a real fight when compared to watching a fight scene that is happening in a restaurant. The sound effect of the movie was typical, stocked mostly. This is to be expected from a retro-Chinese martial art movie. The usage of chalk powder in the movie signified the style of a Chinese kung-fu movie, most American’s movies do not use these feature in their fight scene, leading to a lot boring and torpid fight scenes. Speaking of fight scenes, the movie choreography was amazingly done for the time. This movie is a Jackie Chan’s movie, so fights scene should be fadrmas_stl_4_hst and violence. The director Yuen Woo Ping, which later become one of the most famous action director of all time, directed this movie, and the style of action that he bring was magnificent, and combining with Jackie Chan’s input, it was gold. The fight were well choreographed with the addition of Jackie Chan style of of grabbing everything in sight and slam it into the bad guys heads, the experience was Hell-Yeah! worthy. Although, as discussed above, the Jackie signature was not really shown yet, Drunken Master was still a hell of a movie. Moreover, the comedic elements of Chinese Kung-fu movie was also presented, the movie was funny and action-packed, and as far as I know, American’s movie at that time, have a hard time combining these two together. Despite that, a lot of old slapstick American movie do featured a lot more stunts that are far more dangerous than some of Jackie’s work.

My favourite scenes of the movie are obvious, as brighten as a supernova. It has to be the fight scenes, all of them. They were fast, harmonic, and exhilarating to watch, a typical instalment of Jackie Chan and Yuen-Woo Ping. Besides the obvious, Jackie Chan movies often show a practice montage; pulling off some of the most ridiculous routine I have ever seen. Finally, the “boss battle’ at the end was awesome. The scene bottled a movie that was already riveting and exiting to watch. Confronting his enemy, Jackie had to drink heaps of alcohol, and he annihilated his enemy. You can hope but feel proud but also thoroughly entertained when the credits start rolling.

MY RATES: 9/10

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